Monthly Archives August 2018

The Rights of Renters

Landlords are well within their rights to reject a person with a poor credit history, insufficient income to pay rent, negative references from a previous landlord or employer, or a prior eviction lawsuit. On the other hand, the Federal Fair Housing Acts prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, familial status (having children), and physical or mental disability. With this in mind, anyone who feels that he or she has been unlawfully discriminated against may try to negotiate an acceptable settlement or file a lawsuit. While some landlords don’t like renting to tenants with
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Transfer Your Assets

Many people hire lawyers to draft revocable living trusts for their family with the idea that they will avoid probate upon death. The client’s ability to avoid probate, however, is predicated on the idea that their assets will be transferred into the name of the revocable trust. Typically, lawyers will draft any real estate deeds into the name of the revocable trust for their clients. However, the clients themselves usually will be responsible for transferring the remainder of their assets into the trust. Such assets could include vehicle titles, bank accounts and some beneficiary designations. If the client dies and
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Don’t Play the Fool

Although the old adage “He who represents himself has a fool for his client” needs little explanation, the law does allow an individual to represent himself or herself in most judicial proceedings. This is called acting “pro se” (Latin meaning “for oneself”). Despite what the internet might tell you, there are no easy-to-follow formulas. Legal rules can be complex and arcane. All it takes is a single oversight or mistake for an important legal matter to go wrong. When people ask if they can “do it themselves,” I often say that the problem will not be with what they do,
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Coming to Terms Before Going to the Altar

While many might assume that a “prenuptial agreement” (also known as a “premarital agreement”) is a contract that only wealthy individuals need to be concerned with, it can also be important for the rest of us.  Sometimes the issue is protecting an asset, but sometimes it is protection from liability.  Some marrying couples with children from prior marriages find it beneficial to spell out what property goes to which children. Without a “prenup” – and an updated will – in place, your property may not be distributed in the way you intended.  In the absence of proper advance planning, the
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