Monthly Archives March 2019

Update, Update, Update

I have seen it plenty of times at senior fairs that I attend, when a person comes up to me and explains that they have all of their estate planning documents taken care of. I’m here to tell you that there are plenty of reasons why you should consider updating your documents. Legal changes for your power of attorney documents over the past five years trigger the need for updates. Other changes in your life that should prompt you to make changes to wills or trusts include: the death of a spouse, a child, or a beneficiary, a divorce or
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Why Use a Bankruptcy Lawyer?

Filing for bankruptcy helps debtors discharge burdensome debt, but the process may seem a bit bewildering for those unfamiliar with legal and financial paperwork. However, much in the same way that an accountant helps tax filers gather information and submit it properly, an experienced bankruptcy lawyer can advise debtors and handle all the necessary paperwork. To expedite the process of completing multiple forms, a bankruptcy attorney can use software that prepares clients’ information and file all necessary paperwork with the court. Clients need only supply income, expense, asset, debt, and other necessary information. If any additional forms or documents need
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Lucky in Law?

Think you’ve got the “Luck o’ the Irish?” Well, maybe you have, but don’t leave your legal matters to chance. Whatever your legal needs, you are best served by an attorney with knowledge and experience in both your type of case and the court in which it will be heard. Out of town attorneys may be good – even great – but will not have the “home court advantage” of a local practitioner. At Pruitt Law Offices, S.C., we have over 25 years of experience in the following areas: estate planning, bankruptcy, probate, guardianship, family law, criminal and traffic defense. Whether you’ve found that pot of
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End-of-Life Decisions

An “advance directive” is a collective term for a legal document that enables individuals to make known their decisions about the kind of end-of-life care they wish to receive in the event they become incapacitated. The “living will” or “health care directive,” sets forth a person’s desires with respect to future medical care. A “health care power of attorney” involves the designation of an agent to make future decisions on a person’s behalf should he or she later become incapacitated. The “general and durable power of attorney” is an advance directive that is applied towards financial issues. Advance directives typically
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