Monthly Archives April 2019

To Your Wealth and Health

Increasingly, aging adults with blended families in charge of their care are finding themselves in the midst of family battles over decision-making authority. While a second wife or husband may be designated as health care power of attorney, adult children from the first marriage may pursue a legal challenge to the second spouse’s powers. When these disputes land in court and a judge appoints a guardian or revokes a relative’s authority, it can lead to long-standing resentments that may generate significant legal bills. To circumvent such problems, it is important for aging adults with blended families to choose carefully when
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Starting Your Own Business

Those starting new businesses should know that the simplest form of business is a “sole proprietorship,” which is not a legal entity and simply refers to a person who owns a business. While this popular business form is easy and inexpensive to set up, the owner of a sole proprietorship remains personally liable for all the business’s debts. A “corporation” is separate from its owner, which means that, with some exceptions, it is shielded from personal liability. The “limited liability company” (LLC), which is also protected from personal liability, is not required to adhere to corporate formalities such as annual
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Grandparent Visitation Rights

Divorce, death or absence of a parent may result in grandparents being denied access to their grandchildren. Most people are surprised to learn that grandparents have no automatic right to contact with their grandchildren. A court order may be needed. Wisconsin has a “third party visitation” statute under which a court may grant grandparents visitation with their grandchildren over the objection of the parent(s). This can be a difficult process as the law presumes that a fit parent makes decisions that are in the best interest of his/her child. However, under the right circumstances, grandparents or others may be granted
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Think of Your Children

One of the most important aspects of drawing up a will for parents of young children is appointing a “guardian” to raise the children if both parents were to die before the children reach adult age. If a guardian is not named, the judge would appoint a guardian without knowing whom the deceased parent(s) would have preferred. While naming a guardian in a will does not necessarily ensure that the person named to assume this responsibility will be chosen, the judge is quite likely to respect the deceased’s wishes. Like a parent, a guardian’s responsibility is to care for, provide
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